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CENTRE FOR ADVANCED ASSESSMENT

News


May 2019,

In May 2019, Dr. Izabela Z. Schultz was awarded the Association for the Advancement of Psychological Injury and Law (ASAPIL) Annual Award for Outstanding Achievement. 


April 2019,

Dr. Schultz attended the ABVE Conference in Tuscon, Arizona, presenting on: “Advances in Neuropsychological Assessment: From Research to Courtroom”.


October 2019
Dr. Schultz and Ms. Faith Hayman are pleased to announce their recent article publication in the Verdict titled:  “Assessing Losses and Disability in High Achievers: Challenges and Solutions”.
Dr. Schultz recently attended the “Impairment Without Disability” Conference in Green Bay, Wisconsin, presenting: “Evidence-Informed Approach to Early Identification and Intervention in Occupational Disability”.

Dec 14, 2018

Dr. Schultz recently co-chaired the Trial Lawyers Association of BC (TLABC) conference in Vancouver on December 7, 2018, speaking on Outcome Prediction from Patient Risk Factors and Early Intervention. This presentation discussed integrating clinical and research determinants of disability to make the best predictions for a case, as well as determining what is and is not modifiable regarding early intervention and return to work.


July 24, 2018

We are pleased to announce that Drs. Izabela Schultz, Amir Sepehry and Sarah Greer have recently had six articles published in Psychological Injury and Law, Volume 11, Issue 2, June 2018; Special Issue: From Neuroscience to Forensic Neuropsychology.

We have provided brief summaries of these articles below.
Here also is a link to the Table of Contents: https://link.springer.com/journal/12207/11/2/page/1

 

Psychological Injury and Law, Volume 11, Issue 2, June 2018:

Beyond Traumatic Brain Injury: Advancing Forensic Neuropsychological Assessment
Izabela Z. Schultz, Amir A. Sepehry, Sarah Greer

This article introduces the subsequent series of articles focused on traumatic brain injury (TBI) sequelae, taking into consideration the potential impact of other possible acquired or secondarily induced brain impairments, at times assumed to cause a lesser cognitive impact than TBIs. Injuries and illnesses implicated in civil litigation—and eventually affecting competency—can indeed involve TBI, but also anoxic/hypoxic injuries, pain, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), sensory deficits (e.g., tinnitus), and fatigue, and all, in turn, can affect an individual’s cognitive function and quality of life. This article introduces our series of reviews on impairments caused by these conditions that can be disabling and resistant to treatment, particularly, when the treatment is based on incorrect diagnostic, prognostic, and causality assumptions.

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Cognitive Impact of Fatigue in Forensic Neuropsychology Context
Izabela Z. Schultz, Amir A. Sepehry, Sarah C. Greer

Physical and mental fatigue are common factors affecting function and recovery in litigated injuries and illnesses. Despite the high prevalence of fatigue-related symptoms and anticipated impact on cognitive functioning, forensic neuropsychological assessments are often challenged by multiple differing approaches to the evaluation of fatigue, with risk of confusion  with respect to the significance of fatigue factors and accounting for them. This current review focuses on integrating available empirical evidence from neuroscience and neuropsychology regarding our current understanding of the cognitive impact of fatigue.

Impact of Tinnitus on Cognitive Function in Forensic Neuropsychology Context
Izabela Z. Schultz, Amir A. Sepehry, Sarah C. Greer

Tinnitus, a common hearing condition encountered in medicolegal evaluations, often but not always in association with traumatic brain injuries, can adversely impact both cognitive and affective functioning and neuropsychological test results. More recently, tinnitus has been seen as a condition involving brain plasticity, with a persistent clinical effect on cognition and affect compounded by comorbid psychiatric syndromes such as depression. This paper provides critical review and integration of available empirical evidence to better understand the impact of tinnitus, a factor often difficult to capture and neglected in forensic neuropsychology, and essential for determination of causality, diagnosis, prognosis, functional outcomes, and treatment in medicolegal neuropsychological assessment.

Impact of Pain on Cognitive Function in Forensic Neuropsychology Context
Izabela Z. Schultz, Amir A. Sepehry, Sarah C. Greer

Chronic pain is a biopsychosocial condition with a complex neuroscientific and neuropsychological literature. This review focuses on surveying and integrating the available vast empirical evidence from neuroscience and neuropsychology regarding the cognitive impact of chronic pain.

Impact of Common Mental Health Disorders on Cognition: Depression and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Forensic Neuropsychology Context
Izabela Z. Schultz, Amir A. Sepehry, Sarah C. Greer

The assessment and diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression in forensic evaluations may lack acknowledgement of the neurocognitive impact of these disorders and how they interact with other causative factors, such as traumatic brain injury (TBI), pain or fatigue. This critical review focuses on the available empirical evidence from neuroscience and neuropsychology regarding the cognitive impact of PTSD and depression, since both of these disorders can affect neuropsychological test results.

Anoxia-Hypoxia in Forensic Neuropsychological Assessment: Cognitive Impact of Pulmonary Injuries, Respiratory Distress, Cerebral Blood Hypoperfusion, and Major Surgeries
Izabela Z. Schultz, Amir A. Sepehry, Sarah C. Greer

Sub-optimal oxygen delivery to the brain, transient or long-term debilitating injuries causing neuropsychological changes of various degrees can result. This article critically reviews available empirical evidence regarding anoxia and hypoxia arising from pulmonary injuries and respiratory distress, cerebral blood hypoperfusion, and major surgeries, together with evidence of their impact on cognitive functioning.